Loops allow you to create repeating JavaScript statements. A loop processes the statement over and over until you tell it to stop. There are several types of loops.

While Loops

The While loop is the most basic loop. To start a while loop, rather than using if to begin your statement, as with conditional statements, you write while. Here's an example:

//declare a variable
var x = 1;
//loop the command
while ( x < 100 ) {
//run some code
console.log(x);
}

This script will repeat itself infinitely as long as x is less than 100. You need to tell it to stop looping.

You can stop the loop in a couple of ways. One way is to increment the variable so that at some point, the condition is no longer met:

var x = 1;
//as long as x is less than 100
while ( x < 100 ) {
//write console.log x
console.log(x);
//and increment x by 1
x++
}

Now the script will repeat 99 times. With each iteration, x increments by 1. Once x gets to 100, the code won't execute because the condition ( x > 100 ) isn't met.

Do ... While Loops

There's another way to stop a loop. Rather than beginning with while, you can use the "Do ... While" format:

var x = 1;
//start a loop
do {
// write x to the console
console.log(x);
// and then increment x by 1
x++ }
// and continue as long as x is smaller than 100
while ( x < 100 );

The Do ... While loop differs in that you put the condition after the code block. This means the code block will run at least once regardless of the condition. Once the code block runs and the condition is asked, the loop continues only if the condition is met.

For Loops

Loops typically have three components: an index, a condition, and an increment to the index. The index is a variable you use to start counting your loop. Written out the long way, the statement would look as follows:

// set up your index
var x = 1;
// check a condition
while ( x < 100 ) {
//run some command...
console.log(x);
// increment the index
x++;
}

Because loops are so common, you can write this statement in a more abbreviated way using the for loop. With the for loop, you start the statement with the word for. You then insert the conditions and increment value in parentheses separated by semicolons. You then add the code block. Here's an example:

//while x is less than 100, increment x by 1 with each loop.
for ( var x = 1 ; x < 100 ; x++) {
// run a command...
console.log(x);
}

Break and Continue

You can stop a loop using the words break and continue. Break exits the loop, whereas continue stops the current command and rechecks the conditions to see if the loop can start again at the top.

Here's an example with break:

//while x is less than 100
for ( var x = 1 ; x < 100 ; x++) {
//run this statement
if ( x == 65 ) {
console.log(x);
//then exit the loop
break;
}


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