Tag Archives: Notes

Clive Thompson on the New Literacy

A scholar conducts a 6 year study of student writing and finds that, despite constant accusations that social media is taking writing downhill, actually “we’re in the midst of a literacy revolution the likes of which we haven’t seen since Greek civilization.” I have to agree — it is a cool effect that the social Continue Reading »

An argument for slowing down in an age of rapid online exchanges

This Manifesto for Slow Communication (linked by Karen Mardahl) will make you think twice about the benefits of social networks, email, Twitter, Facebook, IM, and all the constant noise, hectic rushing, and mindless processing that it produces in your life. Busyness—or the simulated busyness of email addiction—numbs the pain of this awareness [awareness of death], Continue Reading »

Why teens don’t use Twitter

Fascinating NYTimes.com article about why teenagers don’t use Twitter (linked by Eddie VanArsdall). A few reasons teens avoid Twitter: it makes it difficult to hide what they’re doing, parents don’t want teens interacting with strangers, the communication is less friend driven and more professional oriented, the tweets are better for marketing or asking questions or Continue Reading »

Converting Lurkers into Contributors in Online Communities — Nielsen’s 90-9-1 Rule

Jakob Nielsen explains that with web 2.0 communities, 90% are lurkers who never contribute, 9% contribute a little, and 1% actively contribute. I wish I knew the secret formula for reversing those statistics. Nielsen mentions a few strategies for improving those stats at the end. One strategy is to take advantage of”read wear,” which refers Continue Reading »