WordPress Automatic Upgrade — Recommended WordPress Plugin

Upgrading WordPress is a pain — backing up your database, downloading the latest zip file, deactivating plugins, deleting old files, uploading new files, running update scripts, reactivating plugins, etc. That’s why when non-major releases like 2.3.1 come around, I often look to see if upgrading is actually worthwhile.

All that has changed now. The WordPress Automatic Upgrade Plugin performs all of the steps automatically, allowing you to upgrade your blog in about 5 clicks. This plugin won third prize in the recent WordPress plugin contest. I highly recommend it — it will make your life easier.

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By Tom Johnson

I'm a technical writer working for The 41st Parameter in San Jose, California. I'm primarily interested in topics related to technical writing, such as visual communication (video tutorials, illustrations), findability (organization, information architecture), API documentation (code examples, programming), and web publishing (web platforms, interactivity) -- pretty much everything related to technical writing. If you're trying to keep up to date about the field of technical communication, subscribe to my blog either by RSS or by email. To learn more about me, see my About page. You can also contact me if you have questions.

20 thoughts on “WordPress Automatic Upgrade — Recommended WordPress Plugin

  1. Pingback: actionsx » Blog Archive » Recommended WordPress Plugin: WordPress Automatic Upgrade

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  3. Brian

    Have you tried it out yet? Did it work as advertised? With much trepidation I might give this a try.

    Thanks VERY much for linking to that WordPress plugin contest! I’m going to try the second place winner, MyDashboard, as soon as I get home from work!

  4. Tom

    Yes, I did use it to upgrade to 2.3.1 and it worked just fine. Well, almost. There are two options for upgrading: automatic and manual click through. The automatic option failed, so I used the manual. The manual process just has you walk through each step by clicking a button. So it’s about 5 clicks, but it can be done under 2 minutes and is a lot easier.

  5. Brian

    I made manual backups of my files and database and reluctantly gave this plugin a try using the automatic update. It worked like a charm, and in about 1/20 the time it usually takes me to update. What a fantastic plugin. Thanks again for the recommendation, Tom!

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  8. Tom

    I agree. I’ve noticed that the plugin conflicts with some other plugins — at times. So I generally leave it deactivated except for when I’m upgrading WordPress. I still love the plugin.

  9. Janet

    Interesting! I’m really helped. It’s really smart idea. Do you know you can make your blog more popular? maybe I can help you, you may contact me at anytime you want.

    Cheers

  10. Greg

    This amazing plugin – worked exactly as was suppose
    to. Delivering intended results – a very rare event
    in today’s environment.

    I upgraded from 2.3.3 – 2.5 with 78 plugins enabled
    and only had to re-activate two.

    Wonderful!!

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