Stay current with the latest in tech comm
Keep current with the latest trends in technical communication by subscribing to the I'd Rather Be Writing newsletter. 4,500+ subscribers

Stitcher radio

Search results

I'd Rather Be Writing

Why I decided not to become a grasshopper expert, or, Not deciding your focus based on where readers are clicking
Although site analytics can be insightful in identifying popular topics, sometimes your most visited content isn't your most beloved content. It doesn't mean you have to switch your interests to align with your visitors' interests over your own.
A hypothesis on how to exert more influence and visibility inside the corporation
Can the same principles for visibility and influence online lead to visibility and influence inside corporate walls?
Upcoming API workshops in Raleigh (April 6) and Denver (May 5)
I'm giving a couple of API workshops soon. The first workshop is April 6, 2019, in Raleigh, North Carolina, offered through STC Carolina. The second workshop is in Denver on May 5, as a pre-conference workshop before the STC Summit.
Recognizing Research Realities Across Technical Communication -- guest post by Kirk St. Amant
In this guest post, Kirk St. Amant argues that despite having common ground through similar research interests, 5 barriers tend to separate tech comm practitioners from academics. These barriers involve Scope, Scale, Speed, Strategy, and Situatedness.
WTD Episode 21: On career growth, leadership, and mentoring in Tech Writing
In episode 21, Becky Todd from Atlassian joins us to talk about career growth, leadership, and mentoring. How do you move up to the next level at your company? Does upleveling require a management track, or there other ways to increase your leadership and influence? We also chat about mistakes we've made, what we've learned, ways to increase our influence and visibility both inside and outside corporate walls, why we sometimes back away from persuasion efforts, the balance between autonomy and micromanagement, mentoring strategies and opportunities, and other career-related topics within technical communication. We also look at the Season of Docs as an opportunity for getting involved in open source projects
Master's in technical writing at Mercer — FAQ
Considering earning a master's in technical writing to move up the career ladder? If so, check out Mercer's online master's in Technical Communication Management program, which is positioned within Mercer's School of Engineering and focuses on teaching you management skills to influence significant organizational change. There are many details to consider when choosing a master's in technical writing program, so I reached out to Pam Brewer, who directs the program at Mercer, with some questions.
Results from survey about engineers who write documentation
I recently conducted a survey with engineers who write documentation to see why they are coming to my API documentation site — whether certain trends are pushing them to write more documentation, or whether the technology landscape is becoming more complex, or some other reason. Results from the survey are provided below. The most interesting result is that engineers who write docs almost unanimously agree that they prefer to treat docs like code.
My documentation takeaways from the Boeing disaster -- two essential doc questions to ask for any project
Although I'm not familiar with FAA-regulated flight manuals, when I read about the Boeing disaster and the lack of information around the controversial MCAS feature, my two takeaways from a documentation perspective are to ask these questions: How does this product differ from other products? and What does the customer need to know? These are challenging questions in any documentation project.
Biking at Alviso County Park (Santa Clara)
A brief account of biking in Alviso County park's pathways.
Should you get a degree in a tech comm program? Two considerations to keep in mind
If you're considering entering a tech comm program to transition into technical writing, keep in mind two considerations — the emphasis on technical skills, and the potential drift from corporate relevance.
How to encourage risk-taking and idealism without falling prey to cynical attitudes born from experience
When we see risk-taking and idealism in younger people, it's hard to avoid adopting a more cynical attitude born from our own learned experience. And yet, encouraging youth to avoid risk-taking and follow a safer route also diminishes the chances of their success.
XML Documentation for Adobe Experience Manager (AEM) — Integrating documentation and marketing content into a seamless whole
XML Documentation for Adobe Experience Manager (AEM) provides a DITA-based CCMS for both technical documentation and digital asset management. Palo Alto Networks used AEM to build a world-class documentation portal. A driving factor in their adoption was the ability to integrate documentation and marketing content.
How to design API documentation for opportunistic (active, experiential) learning styles
A recent study looked at how developers interact with API documentation. It found a mix of systematic and opportunistic learning styles. While we often write with the former in mind, focusing on the latter styles (opportunistic) might be more beneficial, and will cause us to focus on improving search, navigation, interactive components, troubleshooting, error messages, and other action-oriented features.
Confronting the fear of growing older when you're surrounded by young programmers
The engineering demographic can make even a relatively young person seem old. This sense of growing old is causing panic in many tech workers in Silicon Valley. One solution might be to change your mindset about what it means to be young, and to learn to unlearn what you have already internalized unconsciously.
Write the Docs Podcast Episode 20: Minimum requirements for good tech docs, with Matt Reiner
In episode 20, Matt Reiner from K15t joins us to talk about minimum standards for documentation — what techniques or standards can you put in place to help engineers and other contributors meet the minimum requirement for good tech docs? What essential sections, headings, or topics should you include in templates? And how do you help non-native speakers with grammar issues? We also discuss how tech writers can work with marketing to create honest and interesting writing. There seems to be the feeling that tech writing is dull but accurate and marketing copy is flashy and fluffy — we brainstorm ways technical writers can better align with marketing writers.

subscribe via RSS

Stay current with the latest in tech comm
Keep current with the latest trends in technical communication by subscribing to the I'd Rather Be Writing newsletter. 4,500+ subscribers

follow us in feedly